Rules for Success


SSKB talks about some of the responsibilities committee members have in managing strata communities.

Congratulations! You’ve volunteered to be on the committee of your body corporate or owners corporation.

Just like being on the board of a community organisation or a business, being on the committee comes with specific responsibilities – which are all the more important to observe because your decisions impact on your home or your investment.

Your responsibilities are to:

  • Try to develop an understanding of the law and the code
  • Act honestly, fairly and with confidentiality
  • Act in your community’s best interests
  • Comply with the law and the code
  • Not cause a nuisance
  • Disclose a conflict of interest.

As a committee member, your job is to ensure that by-laws are enforced and your community is following the legislation that governs body corporate and owners corporation properties.

On the rare occasion when a committee member is not acting in the best interests of the community as a whole, action needs to be taken.

If you feel that a fellow committee member is in breach of their responsibilities, it is an issue that should be raised at the next committee meeting.

The notice must include:

  • Sufficient details of the breach (limited to 600 words)
  • A statement that the committee member may give any other member of the body corporate a written reply (limited to 600 words) within 21 days
  • A statement that the body corporate will pay reasonable photocopy expenses and postal charges incurred by the committee member
  • A statement that the body corporate is to consider a motion to remove the committee member at the next general meeting.

A committee member who receives the notice must be given an opportunity to provide a written response (limited to 600 words) within 21 days after being given the notice. If a notice is given, the body corporate must include a motion to remove the committee member from their position on the agenda of the next general meeting.

If you find yourself in this (hopefully!) rare circumstance, the best way to address the notice of breach is to:

  • Be calm – leave any emotional baggage behind. Putting a notice in writing while you’re angry or upset will cloud the issue
  • Be professional – just the facts, presented in a calm, logical fashion
  • Be specific – identify the specific areas, perhaps even citing the relevant legislation that reinforces your belief that a breach has occurred
  • Be brief – the word limit is not more than 600 words which is about one and a half A4 pages.


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