Pool safety in strata properties


One child lost, is one too many. Yet according to the Royal Life Saving Society Australia (RLSA), in the last five years, over 150 Australian children under the age of five have drowned. Sadly, many of these incidents have occurred within backyard or complex swimming pools.

As we draw closer to the winter months and the temperature starts to get a little cooler, it’s easy to forget about the significance of pool safety. But with small children on school holidays and visitors stopping by throughout the year, it’s just as important now, to ensure the pool in your strata-title property is safe and secure.

Ultimately it is the responsibility of body corporate to provide safety notices for those using swimming pools but it is the duty of residents and their visitors to remain vigilant and protect the welfare of their own children. At SSKB we strive to deliver the best advice possible for all those living within strata-titled properties and have prepared a quick pool safety checklist with some easy guidelines to follow.

Recognizing Hazards:

Strata pools have increased risks of drowning due to the high number of children who can access them. Identifying hazards can be the first step to preventing accidents occurring in or around your pool.

  • The pool gate should swing back to the closed position after being opened and remain closed. Check that the latch and hinge is working correctly.
  • You should not be able to pull the gate open once latched.
  • If a child jumps on the bottom rail of the gate, it should still be able to stay locked.
  • Pool aids and toys should be stored securely and out of view.
  • Objects that could be used to climb the fence should be removed from the area. Trees and shrubs should be trimmed for this same reason.
  • Always be wary of where the off switch is located for spa and pool pumps.

Supervision:

Adult supervision is one of the most effective methods of preventing a child from drowning.

  • For any child under five years old, you should always remain an arm’s length away from them.
  • Do not leave small children in the supervision of older kids. Always remain attentive and present.
  • Ensure members of your family are up to date with CPR and first aid skills.
  • Check that your pool’s resuscitation sign is current and in clear view. Ensure there are no trees, graffiti or items blocking it.
  • Make sure children using the pool are aware of the rules and restrictions within your specific complex-as they are there for a specific reason. Strata has the ability through the introduction of bylaws to make sure that the pools in their properties meet that best practice standard regardless of where they are located.

Each state and territory has specific requirements for pool safety and currently the legislation between each varies. It is vital to keep up to date with any changes or amendments.

For more tips and information on pool safety, visit;

Home Pool Safety

Department of Housing and Public Works

Department of Fair Trading NSW

 



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