Common Misconceptions of Strata Living-Part 8


Body Corporate

Welcome to part eight of a ten part series discussing the most commonly misunderstood issues related to strata living.

8. What are the positives of strata living?

It is a common misconception that strata living is an un-wise choice to make when looking to invest in property. This is possibly the biggest misconception in the entire series!

Usually, all the news about strata living is dominated by the negatives and this is why the misconception has probably come about! And don’t get us wrong – there are plenty of gripes to be had when it comes to living in a strata scheme, but it’s important not to overlook the many positives of living in a shared community as well!

Common property areas such as pools, decks, barbecues, cinemas, gyms and entertainment areas are often things you might never have had if you lived in a standalone house. All of these amazing common property areas are provided to residents and their guests with virtually no need to help maintain, clean or fix anything if something were to break.

Having the garden and grounds in your community maintained and well-kept without you having to lift a finger is also another huge positive! No mowing, pruning, weeding or watering is required of you to have your grounds looking lovely, lush and inviting to all.

Although you are required to keep up with the maintenance of your own lot, all general building issues and the utility infrastructure is maintained by the body corporate. This means you don’t have to worry about painting, mending, or fixing anything that sits outside the boundaries of your lot. This even extends to smaller tasks such as vacuuming of hallways and entrances and dusting.

Locality is often a big bonus of strata living as well.  The majority of units in Australia are based around CBD areas and are therefore close to shops, public transport, schools and sports.

The beauty of it is you can go away on holiday and when you return your garden is still maintained; your entertainment areas are all still in tip top shape and all you have to worry about is unpacking your bag.

Don’t forget – all these wonderful positives of living in a strata community can also help to substantially increase your investment and are really appealing to buyers.

We would love to hear your thoughts.

What’s your favourite thing about living in a strata community?



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Recent Comments

2 Comments

Lorraine Mizzi On June 24, 2013 | Reply

Dear Lisa, I agree with your article in principle that this can be a positive of strata living, however your article fails to show the flipside of this argument. Many onsite managers do not appreciate the value of “Having the garden and grounds in your community maintained and well-kept… mowing, pruning, weeding or watering… to have your grounds looking lovely, lush and inviting to all.” This in fact can be the bane of one’s life living/owning in strata communities.

    Lisa Moloney On June 25, 2013 | Reply

    Thanks for your feedback- it’s great to hear other’s thoughts and opinions on the situation. Not all onsite managers have contractual agreements for the upkeep of common property, sometimes the responsibility falls to a contractor of the body corporate. A review of the onsite management agreement should clear this up. Either way, if you have any concerns about the state of your common grounds I suggest you put them in writing to the committee, that way they can be raised at the next meeting.

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